American Parser

Standing In The Gap Of The Real And Perceived

Anthony Weiner: Forgiveness Acknowledges Our Parity (Part 5/5)


Rembrandt – “The Return of the Prodigal Son

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In Part 4 of this series, we examined King David’s relationship with Yahweh for clues about the nature of sin, repentance, and forgiveness. We concluded by noting that God‘s rightfulness to judge is due to His absolute righteousness. God alone is qualified to judge others.

But thank God, His love for us makes him much more inclined to forgive. Let us not fool ourselves here; judgment is God’s job. It comes with the territory. But grace – blessing the unworthy, and mercy – not executing judgment on the guilty: these are God’s desires. That’s right; you heard me. God always judges, and He always executes that judgment, but He doesn’t always execute that judgment on the guilty. Strange, but true. This is the good news! This is how God can dispense both justice and mercy perfectly.

To be sure, we are allowed and encouraged to ask for the forgiveness of others we’ve hurt. It’s not ultimately necessary for God’s sake, but it is for ours, so we might as well practice at every opportunity. Besides, He commands it. It is a necessary part of working out our own salvation with fear and trembling. It’s an exercise in emotional purification, an opportunity we should welcome as a reminder of our modest position in the pantheon of mortals.

Likewise, when we forgive others, it doesn’t really relieve them of any cosmic burden. We can’t do that. But to the “forgiven,” it can spark hope for that relief, and give us the satisfaction that comes with participating in their discovery. It helps, of course, if we have first made that discovery ourselves. Practicing the act of pardoning others also allows us to let go, and reminds us of that which has been forgiven us. Basically, it makes us more tolerable to be tolerant of others. Seems like I’ve heard that somewhere. Anyway, it’s not a bad idea, I guess, all in all.

Some of us out there need to get off our horses and practice, starting with this month’s whipping boy, former congressman Anthony Weiner. Can’t get loose from the stirrups? Then maybe you’ve been in the saddle too long. Chafes a little bit, eh? You should be ashamed. Take a humble walk with the rest of us, the Weiners of the world.

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3 comments on “Anthony Weiner: Forgiveness Acknowledges Our Parity (Part 5/5)

  1. joebeans2002
    June 23, 2011

    I can forgive him, and will, but, and a big but, he will never garner my support for public office. He has demonstrated poor judgment which is not a quality that is needed or desired in a position of power. this demonstrable fact alone, disqualifies him from public office now, or at any time in the future.

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    • superlew
      June 24, 2011

      Thank you, Joe, and welcome to American Parser. Your conviction is perfectly understandable, and, as Mr. Weiner has stated on more than one occasion, similar convictions would have been the prerogative of his constituents to express, come election day in 2012, had he chosen to remain in office. Now that he has resigned, though, who knows? If he stepped into the political arena again, it would almost certainly be within the confines of New York State.

      I am making assumptions here, and you are welcome to correct me, but it appears from a cursory glance at your blog, joebeans2002.wordpress.com, that you are Canadian. If that is the case indeed, Joe, may I ask, what effect would you anticipate your support, or lack thereof, would have on Mr. Weiner political ambitions, were he to run for office again? My apologies if I am missing something here. It happens.

      Many thanks once more for contributing to the discussion here on American Parser! Based on the tone you set for your own blog, I would say your input here is always welcome.

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  2. joebeans2002
    June 25, 2011

    Yes, a Canadian. Doesn’t effect us much up here, other than having, and I can’t think of the right words. an appreciation of the American political system. His actions show poor judgment and leadership, both required qualities in a leader that uses judgment. I cannot see any way that he should be re-elected. In Canada, he would be dead in the water. My thinking is along the lines that many “leaders” tread the line, the problem here is that we are 100% sure that he is unsuitable and he should not be glorified in any way.

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This entry was posted on June 23, 2011 by in Unmentionables and tagged , , , , , , , .

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